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, what is all about? >> this is about making the agreement between the u.s. and korea fair. there is a lot of barriers that have existed for a long time in international trade, and with this agreement the governments have got together to try to figure out ways to eliminate a lot of those barriers. lowering the tariffs, creating new opportunities. it is an agreement that will mean jobs and new opportunities for u.s. companies, and partnership with korean companies. >> you mentioned jobs, and that has been a huge sticking point for so many people because our country is hurting right now. the jobs are born to go overseas. the businesses are grim to set up abroad and we will lose jobs. -- the jobs are going overseas. >> american companies need to tap the consumers and send them u.s. products, so we have to figure out ways to encourage that kind of trade, so agreements that give us access to the consumers outside of the united states are beneficial for creating jobs back here in the west u.s. so i look all of the free trade agreements that have been negotiated in ways that are p
about what can and should be done. we are glad you have joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where wal-mart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacleseme conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and brought to you by the aarp foundation. >> wk kellogg foundation. improving the lives of a vulnerable children. wkkf.org. >> of the annie e. casey foundation, helping build a better future for america's kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: even before the name -- numbers came out, we decided to spend some time getting to know the people behind the pottering -- poverty statistics. cornel west joined us. in tonight's episode, we call this one suffering, we look at what motivated us to take this
to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the clandestine operation and the administration's push to punish iran with new sanctions. >> brown: then, we examine the economic and social fall-out from alabama's tough new immigration law. >> woodruff: margaret warner reports on the visit of south korea's president lee as he and president obama celebrate a new trade deal and consider how to rein in north korea's nuclear ambitions. >> with north korea you never have a good option. the worse options is to leave them alone and to let their nuclear missile program go completely unabated for four years of obama. >> brown: ray suarez explores fascinating new research on the genetic makeup of the bubonic plague that killed millions of europeans in the middle ages. >> woodruff: and tom clarke of i.t.n. reports from the remote highlands of colombia, where half the population will inherit early onset alzheimers disease. >> these families' plight has come to attention of the ou
"margin call ." we are glad you joined us. coming up, right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy ne oremove obstacles terme ersationon conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: alfredo quinones- hinojosa is a renowned neurosurgeon and director of the pituitary tumor center at johns hopkins. his remarkable path from mexico to the united states is the subject of a new memoir, "becoming dr. q: my journey from migrant farm worker to brain surgeon." an honor to have you on this program. i just want to touch this hand. >> i am honored to be here with you. tavis: it is my delight. let me jump into it. i
called "reimagining equality." we are glad you can join us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to ernvoncoti satinv a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: and the cahill is a professor for social policy, law, and women's studies at brandeis. she was employed at the eeoc. that led to her testimony on the supreme court confirmation hearings of clarence thomas 20 years ago. her newest book is called "reimagining equality, stories of gender, race, and finding home." good to have you back on this program. we were talking before you came on the air. with the advent of the internet and 24 hour cabl
of the global economy is shifting in this way. it does not mean that the u.s. and europe or less important than ever. but with the growth rates in asia so much higher, the percentage of the global economy based in nation will rise. the u.s. rose at 3%. asia grows at 6%. this way there is more trade, more derivatives, more economic flows, a greater mass of wealth to manage. our business needs to grow along with that. asia is already important to citi's presence and deeply rooted in our past. >> singapore, a good place to do business? a good place to work? >> singapore is as fine a place to do business as any work in the world. that is not an exaggeration coul. the infrastructure is first world and first class. the policy-makers are forward- looking and they understand business. it has agree livestock, wonderful weather, schools -- they have great lifestyle, wonderful weather, and schools. if you go back to singapore on the day i was born in the late 1950's, singapore was not even independent in 1958. today, they are a powerhouse. singapore is not an emerging market. it is a financial services ce
evening and thanks for joining us. google shares take flight after hours, jumping over $30 a share, susie, after the web giant crushed analyst estimates with its latest earnings. >> susie: tom, profits surgedd n bigger gain. here's how the numbers stacked up. google earned $2.7 billion, or $9.72 a share, almost a dollar ahead of analyst's estimates. revenues were also better than expected, up 33% to $7.5 billion. >> tom: joining us with more-- scott kessler. he follows google as senior director of technology research at s&p capital iq. with us tonight in new york. scott, how do you describe these quarterly results from google, blew estimates out of the water. >> yeah, tom, i would say having covered the stock for more than seven years, probably between good and great. google over the years has really delivered time and time again. this quarter was no exception. what was surprising to us was the combination of accelerating revenue growth for the fourth straight quarter as well as continuing improvement in margins reflecting well controlled costs and expenses. that's a combination that i th
into recession and take the rest of us with them. >> we have heard the u.s. say that you're past to g their act together. is any thing that the u.s. can do in practical terms at this point? >> no. from the point of view of european leaders, it is a pretty rich to hear tim geithner telling them what to do. the u.s. did act quickly after their own financial crisis. the banking sector is four times the size of the u.s. banking sector. this often crisis is much bigger, the stakes are much higher. this is a much more difficult situation. much more complex. >> thank you. >> in turkey, rescue workers are continuing to search for survivors from the earthquake. two people have been pulled from the rubble. one of them is a university student that was found alive 60 hours after the earthquake struck. rescue workers broke into applause as he emerged from the debris. our correspondent sent this report. >> slowly, they are digging down into the heart of the masses of concrete that were once people's homes. they are pulling away the masonry piece by piece. four days on, they have heard no signs of life. news
. special report on the very young who is being shipped from the heat -- uganda to the uk for use in witchcraft. and taking a shortcut -- one marathon runner from the 26 miles a bit too much, but taking the bus certainly helped. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also or around the globe. there is heavy fighting in libya denied as troops of the national libyan council push hard into the city intosirte. fighters in the gaddafi stronghold have put up surprisingly fierce resistance, but now, according to bbc reporters who are with forces of the government, there are only a few streets still left in the hands of gaddafi loyalists. >> a war that has lasted nine months across libya has come down to a few streets and suburbs in colonel gaddafi cozy home town. the fighting on the streets of sirte is ferocious and intense. the town is being pummeled and pounded into submission. a place gaddafi favored above all others in libya flattened block by block. after a battle that lasted more than a week, this day began with soldiers from the new government loading their ammunition belts
will understand us better. singapore is very different from the general press description. come and see the difference for yourself. >> singapore'reputations for excellence in education is known worldwide. there are high standards in teacher recruitment and training. there is the goal of unlocking each student's potential. that seems to be at the heart of its success. we spoke with the minister of education. how many students are involved in the public-school system? >> we have half -- we have over half a million children in our school system. >> is most of the education public education? is there a mix of public and private? >> our school system is almost 100% public. >> what percentage of students who graduate from high school would go on to further education? >> over 95% will go on to university or what we call the institute of technical education. >> it is vocational type of education. how are the teachers recruited? >> we think the teachers at the heart of the educational system. no education system can be better than the quality of the educators. we invest heavily in recruiting th
but over, and pledged to pull out u.s. forces by the end of this year. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> woodruff: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we excerpt the president's remarks; and margaret warner talks with white house deputy national security advisor denis mcdonough about the coming draw-down . >> woodruff: then, we ask libya's ambassador to the u.s., ali suleiman aujali, about the questions surrounding moammar qaddafi's death and what's next for his country. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and paul solman talks to author michael lewis about his new book, a travelogue of sorts about nations hit hard by the financial crisis. >> all these different societies were faced with exactly the same temptation-- free money. they behaved radically differently from one another. why? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it'
the stock. >> tom: then, talking tough on trade to boost the u.s. economy. >> i want to see fair trade policies, and if they're not oring to be fair, you cut it off you tax the hell out of them. >> tom: coming up, our interview with real estate mogul donald trump. it's "nightly business report" for thursday, october 20. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everybody. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by suzanne pratt in new york. it's solid sales for microsoft in the company's most recent quarter. >> suzanne: tom, firms are buying microsoft's office and server software, and that business offset weak consumer demand for p.c.s. microsoft earned 68 cents a share in its fiscal first quarter, in line with wall street forecasts. revenues, however, were a bit better than expected, coming in at $17.3 billion. >> tom: microsoft shares traded slightly lower after-
broadcasting. >>> welcome. i'm sitting in for bob agger nethy. thank you for joining us. a federal judge upheld most of alabama's controversial immigration law. they ruled police officers can be required to check the immigration status of anyone they suspect is in the country illegally. public schools must check the status of students. the part of the law opposed most vigorously by many religion groups was struck down. christian clergy outlawed transporting or harboring illegal immigrants and prevented them from minstering to certain people. the judge's decision is expected to be appealed by both sides. >>> an american-born radical preacher was killed in yemen by an air strike this week. officials considered him a major terror threat to the united states. his anti-american sermons inspired several plots against the u.s. ethicists and religion voices raised questions about whether the killing violated law or denied his right to due process. on our website we have a segment on the ethical issues raised by the use of drones. the council considered the palestinian request for independent state. it'
after this. this rebel fighter told us he and a select group had known for a number of days that the former dictator was holed up, but they had kept the information secret. "-- >> if we had revealed the secret, anything could have happened. gaddafi might have tried to escape just as a woman or even committed suicide. >> more than 24 hours after his death, colonel gaddafi still lay unburied. the people are trying to rebuild their country and to leave libya still needs to be convinced that the former dictator is finally gone. >> the libyan people do not believe that he is dead. >> pictures are also now emerging that throw into question the circumstances surrounding the death of colonel gaddafi's son. the pictures taken shortly after his capture show him i lied and relatively relaxed. but his bullet-scarred body in the freezer shows a different story. -- the pictures taken shortly after his capture show him alive and relatively relaxed. more from the corner will conduct a post-mortem pyridine national transitional council maintains gaddafi was killed in crossfire, but the evide
to have you with us. as the occupy wall street movement spreads around the world, religious leaders continue to play a role in the demonstrations. in london, st. paul's ka ahead at yal ral shut down for the first time since world war ii about the growing protester who is set up camp on the church's grounds. they worried their presence was a safety hazard. here in the u.s., more than 200 clergy signed a petition calling for economic justice and offering spiritual support to the protesters. while jewish groups have been part of the protest, the anti-defamation league condemned what it said has been anti-semitic signs at some of the demonstrations. religion continues to play a prominent and controversial role this presidential campaign season and came up in the republican presidential candidate debate in las vegas we have a report. >> mitt romney said candidates should not be selected on the basis of faith. >> that are idea that we should choose people based on religion for public office is what i find most troubling because the founders of the country went to great length to make sure
in washington using terrorists from mexico. we talked with f.b.i. official john miller and author roya hakakian. >> there were the rivalries between iran and saudi arabia have only become more and more pronounced since the arab spring and since the growing of the tensions between iran and saudi arabia. >> charlie: we colude this evening with a conversation about chinese aunt pureship wang boming president of the stock exchange and executive council and the two partners. >> we solve our problems with the history of china and converse form relations from -- electricity and car. now the two countries work together in a way to get the maximum geration of products to solve the problem we are facing. i think we have this opportunity and also obligation. >> charlie: wall street protests, accusations against iranian officials and chinese entrepreneurship when we continue. >> every story needs a hero we can all root for, who beats the odds and comes out on top. that this isn't just a hollywood story line,t's happening every day all across america. every time a storefront opens or the mnight oil is bur
deals, and they're all about boosting u.s. jobs. >> and this jobs bill, mr. speaker, does not require a tax increase. this jobs bill does not require us to go into debt. and this jobs bill has bipartisian support. >> tom: from boosting jobs through trade to losing jobs on wall street, we look at what job cuts in the world of finance could mean for the u.s. economy. it's "nightly business report" for wednesday, october 12. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. high hopes on wall street today. u.s. investors bought up stocks after european officials rolled out what's seen as the most credible plan so far to prop up european banks. tom? >> tom: susie, the plan was rolled out today by the president of the european commission, jose manuel barrosa. he called on european leaders to act quickly and agree at a meeting in two weeks. here's what he's calling for. europea
. bill gates says the world has rarely seen a man with the impact steve has had. even the president used water to show condolences'. -- used twitter to show condolences'. >> he had a tremendous charisma, and he believed things so passionately that you would believe them. >> steve jobs, adopted as a baby and later a college dropout, was always determined to follow its own path. more than 30 years ago with apple's co-founder steve wozniak he said out to bring personal computers into the home. >> almost any time we had discussions about how something should be done, he was almost always right. >> the drive for perfection made him a demanding colleague, but he persuaded consumers to pay top prices for gadgets like the iphone and the ipad that look and often worked better than their rivals. and when he was forced out of apple for more than a decade, it changed another industry with picks are. he pioneered the animation unit. he tells students at stanford university that facing death brought things into focus. >> your time is limited, so do not waste living someone else's life. do not be trapp
america. license to kill, two men linked to iran are rest inic the u.s. after allegedly trying to assassinate the saudi ambassador. it is a plot made for the movies, says the fbi. child sacrifice in uganda. little allen was lucky to survive. >> the man that he claims kidnap him for sacrifice lives in this village. members of this community tell us that they continue to take children and sacrifice them. >> tiny slovakia deals a blow to the massive bureau -- eurozone. can they ever find economic harmony? welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also are around the globe. the plot to assassinate the saudi ambassador was conceived and directed from iran according to u.s. officials. they announced they had broken up the alleged scheme and arrested two men with links to the iranian government. they vow to iran would be held accountable. dodge the alleged plot was to kill this man, the long servings saudi ambassador. the head of the fbi said it sounded like fiction, but the plot was all too real. >> individuals from one country sought to conspire with a drug trafficking cartel in
money or your life," you choose to hand your money over. >> tom: and back in the u.s., the economy does more than limp along, taking the threat of recession off the table for now. >> the message is that the economy is still recovering. it's a slow growth recovery, it's a bumpy one, but the recovery is ongoing. >> tom: it's "nightly business report" for thursday, october 27. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib remains on assignment. we have good news from both sides of the atlantic ocean today, pushing major stock indices into positive territory for the year. it was a big day of buying for shareholders. the dow rocketed up 339 points to close above 12,000 for the first time since early august. the nasdaq shot up almost 88 points. the s&p 500 rallied more than 42 points. big board volume spiked to just under 1.5 billion sha
us all have said we're all in the middle class, except for the very rich who are in some sort of divine class. obviously not aristocrats. i ask you where is the working class, where are the people who repair things with their hands, dig holes and not all illegal immigrants you know. some of them are honest to american. why have they been excluded from the political debate as though they do not exist? it's because politicians have wanted to persuade us all that we're doing rather better than we are and they have ratchetted us into this great lump of classlessness called the middle class. anyway, i shall be looking for the truth, i shall be out looking for the working class. now when we come back we're going to have an extraordinary discussion with two of the most gifted and talented men in washington about america and the world. where it's been, why it's changed its position in the world and peoples attitudes to us as our stature has changed, if not declined. be right back. you'll find it compelling, i assure you. >> many have spoken out on the need to transition to a clean ene
>> susie: stocks flirt with new lows for the year on growing concerns about the u.s. and global economies. >> our markets are so fragile, the littlest thing really moves our markets in a negative way. >> tom: from bankruptcy rumors swirling around american airlines to fresh lows for bank of america investors. it's "nightly business report" for monday, october 3. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business port" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. a grisly start to the fourth quarter on wall street. the major averages tumbled today as much as 3%, moving stocks closer to bear market territory, tom. >> tom: susie, investors were startled by news that greece will miss deficit reduction targets it agreed to as part of its bailout deal. concerns about europe continue to impact trading here in the u.s. at the bell, the dow plunged 258 points. the nasdaq lost almost 80 and the s&p fell 32. trading volume starts
-will gestures by israel in order to move negotiations forward. >> michelle, thanks for joining us. in the last few minutes, a number of palestinian prisoners who were released today have arrived in syria. these were the scenes broadcast live on syrian tv at the airport as the prisoners got off their plane to a crowd of cheering well-wishers. under the terms of today's exchange, 40 detainees were immediately deported from palestinian territory. turkey and qatar will also take in some. for the latest on the prisoner swap deal, head to our web site. you will find reaction from families of the thousand or so prisoners due to be exchanged for shalit. and that's all at bbc.com/news. now to libya and the u.s. secretary of state, clinton has held talks with the leaders of libya. at a town hall style meeting, mrs. clinton said she was proud to be standing on the free soil of libya and seeing its future being born. we have this report from tripoli. >> hillary clinton flue into tripoli on a military transporter not her usual american boeing and not equipped to deal with the threat of surface-to-air missi
. the deaths have gotten more gruesome. veracruz used to those -- to boast that it was mexico's safest city. more than 100 people have been killed in the last month. 35 people have been left in the street in daylight. empty homes have been boarded up after they were used as headquarters. >> this is one of more than three locations were more than 30 bodies were found just a few days ago. it is part of a vicious battle that has been taking place, and the marines have now been deployed to the streets of the city which until recently was prepared please save region was perfectly safe. >> many of them are victims of tit-for-tat. speaking out is a rare and dangerous thing to do in mexico, but janet figueroa is prepared to take to clear her father's name. he was a mechanic caught in the crossfire of a gun battle. janet says the state fabricated evidence he was a criminal. and why is this used to be a safe city. i never imagined something like this -- >> this used to be a safe city. i never imagined something like this would happen. we have received threats, but i have to speak out that civilians a
abreast of the changes around us and improve the lives of our people. >> we were here 11 years ago. it has turned out to be set a dynamic city state. >> the whole region has moved, and we have tried to keep abreast of the developments around us. the momentum is there because there is a dynamism from china and india opening up. southeast asia is not doing too badly, and in singapore we have tried hard to work together cohesive league, and to do things that will put us in good stead for the long term, investing in our people and city and infrastructure, educating our people, bringing in projects and jobs so that we do not just have a high gdp, but a good quality of life. >> you mentioned the people here, and ambassador chan back in washington is fond of saying the people here are the natural resources. do you agree? it is only thing we have. location is important for us. really we depend on our people to create wealth and create our own future. we have no timber or hydroelectric power. >> is that the reason, the heavy investment in education? >> yes. we see that as our future, and our people
posted impressive gains in october, but november could also be a key month for the markets. the u.s. economy and the european financial situation will continue to be watched closely. and don't forget, a third of the firms in the s&p 500 still have to report third-quarter results. so far this earnings season, the message from corporate america has been pretty encouraging. >> as we've gotten through this earnings season-- the third quarter reporting season-- we are still seeing 70% of companies beating expectations-- about 16% year-over-year-growth. in terms of profits, it's still very, very strong. >> reporter: many strategists predict stocks could gain 5% to 10% by the end of the year. the big caveat is what happens in europe. >> it's kind of like groundhog day, where we wake up to the same movie over and over again-- the same situation. i think this europe situation is going to come back. i think it is going to plague us again. >> reporter: so although there could be more goodies in store for stocks the next few months, it's clear the market's goblins haven't entirely disappeared.
drones are used to target terrorists. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks to anita hill about her new book on race and gender, 20 years after she accused then-supreme court nominee clarence thomas of sexual harassment. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on >> if i can symbolize the ability to pursue gender equality, racial equality and to be truthful about our experiences, then absolutely that's what i want to be. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in tru
: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is on assignment tonight. europe and the u.s. economy-- those troublesome issues pressured stocks today. there were conflicting signals today on how close european leaders are on a deal to solve the debt crisis ahead of a crucial summit this weekend. investors are concerned that talks between france and germany have stalled. and in greece, one of the largest demonstrations as people protested a new batch of austerity measures. the greek parliament takes a final vote on the plan tomorrow. also worrying investors? a pessimistic report on the u.s. economy from the federal reserve. its beige book survey of regional economies showed weaker conditions for growth. all that led to a negative close on wall street. the dow lost 72 points, the nasdaq dropped 53 and the s&p slipped 15. earlier in the day, averages were solidly in positive territory. as suzanne pratt reports, today's volatility is a pattern of trading that will be with us for a while. >> reporter: one day we're up. one day we're down. with the u.s. stock market experiencing such wild
the mark. alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld joins us with an update. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, october 11. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. a bad start to earnings season-- late today, alcoa posted a skimpy profit that was much lower than expected. the aluminum giant is the first dow component to report and, susie, investors are worried that this a is bad omen for upcoming quarterly results. >> susie: tom, investors were disappointed-- alcoa reported right after the closing bell, and the stock fell more than 3.5% following the earnings release. here's why-- the company earned 15 cents a share in the third quarter, up from a year ago, but seven cents below analysts' estimates. alcoa blamed it on a big drop in aluminum prices and slow economic growth. revenues came in slightly ahead of estimates, up 21% to $6.4 billion. joi
. >> a lot of us hoped it was going to be a different kind of president. perhaps because he looked and talks like a different president, but for two years i was at scheduling secretary for u.s. senator alan cranston. working in the internal gears of the democratic party, i got to see what a huge influence money has. there is this nexus of moneyed interests and political power that has swallowed our society hold. the people who pay for it are the people on the bottom rungs of the latter. that is why you see these austerity measures across europe causing such conflagrations from greece to spain to madison, wisconsin. tavis: what do these kinds of songs do? what do they put out in the universe in troubled times like these? >> growing up, music was something that really steeled my backbone for the struggles in my life around issues of race and class. i think they can do the same things now. in our country, there has never been a successful, progressive struggle that did not have a sound track. whether the civil rights movement, workers' rights, women's rights, there have to be songs at the barri
live at or below the poverty line, and i will be joined by vicki escarra . we thank you for joining us on night two of the poverty tour. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. one last place to gether with your community. >> nationwide insurance improve financialley, and impre literacy one question at a time. >> brought to you by the aarp foundation. ♪ >> the w.k. kellogg foundation, improving the lives of vulnerable children. learn more at wkkf.org. ♪ >> america's kids and families. >> and by ctributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. ♪ tavis: in our second part of the poverty t we look at the inw pour,or," who used to be the middle class. >> the blues are a personal catastrophe expressed lyrically. >> the white literary blues. >> i teach them in my class. >> the tennessee williams festival. >> me and my wife -- all of us. trying to get here. you have to keep our home. >> the new pouor are the form er middle class. >> i had a job, a family, what people are supposed to have. i have nothing. >> hatred or revenge, at the blues fest, it is about the love
a plot to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s., a scheme that they said was conceived of and sponsored by the iranian government. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the charges and the alleged conspiracy. >> ifill: then we look at opening day in the trial of the so-called underwear bomber, who tried to bring down a u.s. airliner on christmas day 2009. >> brown: we debate the merits of president obama's jobs bill with two senators: michigan democrat carl levin and georgia republican johnny isakson. >> ifill: john merrow examines the dilemma faced by a pennsylvania school system that spent big on a state-of-the-art facility. >> reporter: the economic crisis hit. like rural school districts all across the country, this school had to put its ambitious dreams on hold almost overnight. the challenge became to make ends meet. >> brown: and ray suarez talks to a 94-year-old former french resistance fighter who urges young people to take to the streets and show their outrage. >> ifill: that's all ahead on
of pakistan gives his frank assessment of where things stand up with the u.s. >> there is a lack of confidence between the u.s. and pakistan. >> get ready, broadway. "chinglish" is coming to town with a new take on language barriers that leaves audiences laughing. welcome to our viewers on pbs and around the globe. the french president calls it a deal that has saved the world from catastrophe. markets around the globe surged after european leaders agreed on a plan to contain the debt crisis. within hours, harmony was broken when mr. sarkozy told french television that greece should never have been allowed to join the eurozone at all. in a moment, the reaction from the greek foreign minister, worst air report from our foreign editor. >> financial markets rose following news europe's leaders have agreed on a plan to fix the eurozone crisis. they did not get all the detail they were looking for, but what they heard exceeded expectations and has fought iraq time to deliver on commitments made. -- and has bought europe time to deliver on commitments made. >> i am very aware of the world is watching
a truly nasty dog. my dog never bit them. we will talk today about the decline of the u.s. postal service, the loss of an enormous number of jobs as the internet has taken away the mail. first-class mail has fallen tremendously. even junk mail has fallen and the post office, that very core of the small town or a village may go away, it may be closed. the actual retail outlet may be close. the postal service itself, an incredible distributive system may be a shadow of its former self. as is western union, a very slight shadow of its former self. these are the times we live in. these are the days of destructive technologies. we will be right back to talk about the post office and you and the post office. ♪ >> many have spoken out on the need to transition to a clean energy future. at exelon, we are acting. by 2020, we are committed to displacingriet mscon t metric tf greenhouse gases annually, helping our customers and communities reduce their emissions and offering low carbon electricity and the marketplace. we are taking action and we are seeing results. ♪ >> "white house chronicle" i
in america starting monday october 10. we will bring you five nights of our travels around the u.s. it is called the poverty tour. all next week will introduce you to the new face of a poor and feature conversations with leaders including kathleen sebelius, jeffrey sachs, a and cornell west among others. we are glad you joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where wal-mart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: when her homeland became torn apart by rebels, she decided to fight back. she cursed and empowered women to fight for peace and a new era of stability in the country. a new memoir about it is ca
to technology and the know how to use it, the more they can participate in the country's booming economy which would get a $1 billion stimulus for the world cup and olympics. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown assesses the state of the banking industry, as some of the largest financial institutions report growing losses. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences, tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was mad
's experiment in religious education: the nation's first multi-faith school of theology. >> sock of us are looking in a jewish direction. some of us are looking in a muslim direction. some are looking into n a christian direction and yet we're all looking in a god direction. >> woodruff: plus, different screens for different kids. we look at the "app gap" among the nation's children. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and
problems of the u.s. are deeper and structural. >> there's no doubt whatever term you use china does manipulate or manage its currency and there are both economic and politic reasons for doing that. obviously they want to support exports which, you know, which are mainly private companies or foreign-invested companys which are the greatest source of job growth in cha which, you know, helps keep the country stable. but tre's also a political imperive in a way. anormal sort of calibration of the strength of chinese export, the currey could be 20% to 40%. but if you had in china an open capital account and the freely floating currency godnows what would happen because the financial system is not stable, money could flee the country as much as come into it. and you could see a collapse in the currency as you might see an appreciation of it. so i think china is quite unstable without strong controls and so it's not ju an attempt to get an economic advantage. i think it's a way that... it's one of the element it is communist party uses to manage the economy and then stay in power. >> liu:
job prospects and heavy debt loads. u.s. student loan debt could top $1 trillion this year, over taking credit card debt. with so much money at stake, the occupy wall street movement is pushing the idea of debt forgiveness for students. darren gersh looks at whether that idea could really boost the economy. >> reporter: kelly mears says his high school counselors and everyone else in the student loan system told him not to worry about the debt he was taking on. >> they told me to dig my grave, essentially, and you know, really. >> reporter: like many of the students in the occupy wall street movement, mears hasn't been able to find a job, and now he and many other protesters are pressing for relief on their student loans. >> i think interest should be forgiven, at the very least. i would like to see student loan debt forgiven, i think it would actually be a huge economic boost. and for our generation-- a whole generation of people it would re-empower them. >> reporter: but analysts say that empowerment would be expensive. >> i'm sure we all feel that we deserve forgiveness. >> r
in syria force the u.s. to withdraw its ambassador. >> woodruff: margaret warner examines new tensions in the u.s. pakistan relationship. >> i think the obama administration understands that the relationship with pakistan spiraling out of control will jeopardize their ability to leave afghanistan. >> ifill: we look at the administration's plan to jumpstart the ailing housing industry, as president obama visits nevada, the state hit hardest by foreclosures. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks with the irish nobel laureate known as "famous amus" about his newest collection of poems and his life's work. >> i began to write poems about my parents, kind of elegaic poems connecting up with n chain. generations, so that >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major fundinfor theab pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences, tailored to individual
did. he was almost like a presentation card. when i used to go to studios for auditions, and they said to me, "what have you done," he was the guy, pedro almodovar. he opened the door for me to have access to places i probably would not have. tavis: unpacked this for me. what is happening or not happening in your life for now that makes you want to return to him to break all the rules? >> maybe because i have been working in the united states for 21 years. in a way, i am kind of handicap here to a very strict number of characters that can be offered to me. you had the feeling when i came to this country 21 years ago that i could not speak the language of all. i did "the mambo kings" but speaking a language. i learned the lines unethically. i have an interpreter to understand what i was hearing from my director. in a box, in a way. that allows me to play a specific number of characters with a specific number of directors. i have done a lot of epics, mainly spanish characters, which i absolutely prefer, because i am proud of my heritage and community. but at this point, you want to do so
to begin her journey back to the u.s. very soon. the appeals court ruling comes four years after her roommate, meredith torturkircher was foun. the court case has played out in the court in the media. >> after spending most of the day in prison, she came back to the court for nighttime verdict. her face drained of color, amanda noxubee this was a moment that could change her life. and then came the decision she had been dreaming of for almost four years. >> the defendant is acquitted because they have not committed the crime. amanda knox's been freed. >> sobbing, amanda knox was led from court. minutes later, her sister spoke outside. >> we are thankful to the court for having the courage to overturn this decision. >> the murder victim was meredith kercher. she had been found with her throat slit several times in the home she shared with a mendon box. amanda knox and her boyfriend fell under suspicion because of their strange behavior after the murder and their stories kept changing. the evidence against her began with the life she told during questioning. police discovered what migh
with us. president obama met with top leaders of the national association of evangelicals this week at the white house. >> it was the first time the president met with the group. among the topics discussed, religious freedom abroad, jobs here at home and cuts to the federal budget. the nae has urged lawmakers not to reduce foreign aid or domestic programs that serve the poor. >> meanwhile, outside a d.c. courthouse, other religious leaders held a prayer vigil opposing budget cuts to anti-poverty programs. >> 11 members of the religious group were facing misdemeanor charges for "intention to disrupt congress" during a prayer vigil at the capitol last july. those charges were dropped after the leaders agreed not to enter the capitol for 6 months and to submit to drug testing. >>> as the occupy wall street protests continue, there is now a noticeable religious presence at t mthass gaerings. sukkahs, the temporary structures built to mark the jewish holiday of sukkot, were constructed at some of the protest sites. earlier, prayer services were held for yom kippur. an interfaith group of
america. billionaire behind bars. the u.s. -- what this sentence for insider trading. workers snatched from the largest refugee camp. and the chilean miners celebrate one year after their rescue. their fate has not always been so mary. -- so merry. welcome to our viewers on pbs and around the globe. today raj rajaratnam was sentenced for his role in one of the biggest insider-trading cases in history. they had pushed for 25 years. the judge issued a warning to anyone tempted to follow the same path. we were in the courtroom and sent this report. >> it is hard to believe that raj rajaratnam was once little- known outside the world of wall street hedge funds before he came a poster boy for crimes that judge described as a virus in our business culture that needs to be eradicated. the drama played out inside this manhattan courthouse in room 17 b. he has only a few weeks before he must report to prison on november 28. down the road on wall street, they have been watching closely. raj rajaratnam was accused of making $50 million running an insider-trading ring. buying and selling shares in
house chronicle." the tragic death of steve jobs reminds us that what changes our lives is not political. the great figures of science and in addition, thomas edison, steve jobs, changed our lives as much or more than politicians. across the landscape there are so many political reporters and people with an interest in politics here in washington. the big story is how technology is changing our lives, making new jobs but subtracting others. i have assembled some of the very best of the political right is in washington. they will be right with us. >> hello again and thank you for coming along. i promise you a great panel in i am d like to be sitting here with that great panel. led by linda gasparello. welcome back to the program. a new hat. >> it is the same hat. >> it is a different hat. i am sure. and from hearst newspapers, chuck lewis. nice to have you back at the table. amd frp, "the new york post," geoff earle. and we have from newsweek, dan stone. you have grown up so much since last time. >> i am starting to grow facial hair. >> i was starting to ask you if you shake. but since yo
was for all of us. >> rose: what was his passion? >> when i spent time with steve he talked a lot about solving end user problems, solve computer problems but doing it in an artistic way. he saw beauty as a part of everything he did. if you look at his history, he viously was involved with pixar and movies and so forth. he cared a lot about how the average person, the average human around the world consumed things. was it beautiful, was it artistic, was it clever. if you look at the apple stores and the art there, over and over again he is a combination of technology and artists. an analogy would be from history would michelangelo who did both. there were very, few such people in history. >> rose: it is often said about him that he understood design better than anybody else. and in saying that, some people did not recognize that he understood techlogy. you are a technologist. you are formally a chief technology officer at sun miosystems and have d a distinguished career and came out of that kind of academic background. steve had a different academic background but most people in technol
it is communist party uses to manage the economy and then stay in power. >> liu: and then charl's interview with author robin wright. her new book is called "rock the casbah: rage and rebellion across the islamic world." >> i think what we're goi to see is something that confuses us in the west because it has two parts. one is this quest for political participation, accountability we're seeing in the trials, as in the hosni mubarak in egypt, the idea of justice and fairness. but it also has a desire to be islamic and these two things are going to confuse us. it's a different kind of islam. today islam is a means to an end not an end in self. 40 years ago the majority of women in egypt didn't wear hijab, the islamic head covering. today over 80% do. but thatoesn mean there fanatics, that they want to see the muslim brotherhood take over in egypt, that they want sharia islamic law to prevail rigidly. it a expression of we want islam as the cultural milieu, the environment in which chan. it's no different, really, than the kind of judeo-chstian values so many of us have in the westn terms of d
viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib remains on assignment tonight. some mixed news on the economy today. let's start with the good news. consumers spent more money last month, putting off fears of a recession. spending increased six tenths of a percent, that's three times what was spent in august. americans bought big ticket items like cars and computers. but, there is a flip side. and as darren gersh reports, consumers are spending faster than they save and faster than they earn. >> reporter: if americans have learned anything in the last few years, saving less and spending more is not a recipe for long run economic health, but that's what consumers were doing last month. >> wages are stagnant. people are not getting raises, people are not getting bonuses. so what's happening is that the average consumer is having to dip into her or his savings in order to keep food on the table, in order to pay mortgages, in order to pay their bills, in order to buy gasoline et cetera, and that is not sustainable. >> rep
not only take europe down, but could actually start to affect the u.s. as well. so the stakes are very high here. >> suzanne: from europe to earnings, it's a golden quarter for the golden arches and a few other big firms. what the results may suggest about the economy.. it's "nightly business report" for friday, october 21. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everybody. susie gharib is on assignment tonight. i'm joined by suzanne pratt. suzanne, earnings and europe battled for investors attention today. stocks rallied as optimism grew ahead of this weekend's summit of european leaders. tom, several big blue chip firms reported solid results. we'll get to those numbers in a moment. but first, the market: the dow rose 267 points, the nasdaq added almost 39 and the s&p tacked on 23. trading volume, the heaviest this week. 1.1 billion shares on the big board. 2.1 bill
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